Tag Archives: The Smartest Kids in the World

The Smartest Kids in the World are created by the smartest (and bravest) education policy makers.

Gregg Glover Harvard School of Education

This week’s edition of The Economist contains a review and discussion of Amanda Ripley’s “The Smartest Kids in the World: And How They Got That Way.”  The book readdresses some of theAmanda Ripley woes in the US education system where the notion of ‘teaching to the test’ has become the norm and ‘critical thinking’  has been forgotten. As usual, Finland and several Asian countries do very well. Poland also gets good marks for the improvements in its education system. European who have been panicking about the supposed army of Polish plumbers ready to invade Britain, France and Germany should be warned. Soon they may be joined by battalions of  highly skilled accountants, lawyers and doctors. Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under Business Schools, Education, Europe, Exchange study programs, Higher Education, Management, Strategy, USA

BOOK REVIEW: “The Global Achievement Gap” by Tony Wagner (2010)

The Global Achievement GapThis week’s edition of The Economist contains a review and discussion of Amanda  Ripley’sThe Smartest Kids in the World: And How They Got That Way.” The book readdresses the paradox that the USA has the best universities in the world but does badly on international tests in secondary education.  The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) ranking places the US 25th out of 56 participating countries for mathematical skills, just ahead of Latvia, and behind the Slovak Republic.  Ms. Ripley’s book is largely reiterating many of the ideas by Tony Wagner in his book, “The Global Achievement Gap.”  Ignored for several years when it was first written, it has today become a highly influential book.  Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review, Careers, Education, Higher Education, human resources, Leadership, Management, New York, USA