Tag Archives: Harvard

BOOK REVIEW: “How Countries Compete: Strategy, Structure, and Government in the Global Economy” by Richard Vietor (2007)

How Countries Compete: Strategy, Structure, and Government in the Global EconomyHow Countries Compete is a political and economic strategic analysis of 11 different countries around the world.  The book is divided into 12 new chapters, which deal with one country per chapter.  Japan is dealt with twice, looking at it from a historical perspective at the beginning of the book, and then looking more towards the future and there after the pre 1990 crisis.  Richard Vietor uses the word “compete” in the sense that countries try to compete for market share in the world economy and gain foreign investment and export their sales in business.  Governments can help in this policy, either by macroeconomic policies that encourage investment and greater economic activity, or by things like increasing human resource competencies through education.  Some countries have very active and direct policies.  In China, for example, technology transfer and know-how has been encouraged through the use of FDI.  In Singapore, workers are required to save as much as 50% of their gross income for their retirement plan.

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Filed under Asia, China, Economics, Finance, India, Japan, Politics, Strategy, USA

EFMD Annual Conference 2013: “Reinventing Education” by Howard Lurie

EFMD Annual Conference 2013: "Reinventing Education"This year at the EFMD Annual Conference, the trend of Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCS) were highlighted and built upon by Howard Lurie, the Vice President for External Affairs for edX, a Harvard and MIT online course initiative.  The traditional model for higher education is now changing to reflect the emergence of open source content and learning online.  The advantages and disadvantages of going online were discussed, how traditional university models could work with MOOCs to their benefit, and what the next steps forward are for edX amidst all this. 

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Filed under Business Schools, E-learning, Education, Higher Education, Innovation, Management, Strategy, Technology

Co-teaching on Leadership & Management with Dr. Gregg Glover: the video…at last!

new glover

Last year, I had the pleasure of welcoming Dr. Gregg Glover from Harvard University to co-teach a lesson co-teach in Leadership, Management, and Strategy to Master in Management students at my school. I wrote this up in a post in December and after a short artistic pause, the video has now been completed. Many thanks to all of those who were involved.  Continue reading

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Filed under Business, Business Schools, Corporate culture, Education, Higher Education

BOOK REVIEW: “From Higher Aims to Hired Hands” by Rakesh Khurana (2007)

coverThis book caused quite a stir when it was first published and perhaps not surprisingly since it is an “insider’s account” of why business schools have never gained the respectabilty they have searched for over the past century. Rakesh Khurana is a Harvard Business School professor whose book came at an end of a decade of a great deal of criticism of business schools that came mostly from within. That was just before the current financial crisis. Since the beginning of this crisis those criticisms have continued to grow.

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Filed under Book Review, Business, Business Schools, Economics, Higher Education, Management, MBA, Sociology

The 2012 Olympic Games: Managing your own talent…or trying not to give it away

  

The 2012 Olympic Games begin today in London and there will be much talk over the coming weeks of the dedication and talent of the winners. Though none of us as yet know the names of the gold medalists of each event, one thing is certain, a lot of extremely gifted and hardworking individuals will return to their countries with nothing more to show than their participation in the games. Does this make them losers? Of course not. Continue reading

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Filed under Business Schools, Corporate responsibility, Great Britain, Higher Education, Management, Rankings