Category Archives: Psychology

BOOK REVIEW: “Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die” by Chip Heath & Dan Heath (2010)

Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others DieDid you know that the Great Wall of China is the only man-made object visible from space? You did? It’s not true.  It’s what´s known as an urban myth.  These are so stories that are so popular that they have become ingrained in our culture, and become retold throughout the world.  In Made to Stick, Chip and Dan Heath explain why some of these stories ‘stick.’

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Filed under Behavior, Book Review, Culture, Intercultural, News, Psychology, Sociology

Building a better organization through strong leadership.

Business people in a meeting

A guest blog by Patrick Mazzariol and Tricia Underwood. 

The most important asset to an organization is the people making employee retention a critical element of the organization.  An employee’s reason for leaving their company may not be what you suspect: more money, a better title or a new career opportunity.  In fact, when one million people were polled by Gallop in 2008, 82 percent responded, stating that, “I left my manager not the company.” The same poll found that there is a high correlation between employee satisfaction and performance, and an even higher correlation between leadership practices and employee satisfaction. A manager’s leadership skills have greater influence on employee fulfillment at work that most companies are willing to recognize. Companies must take an active role to build key leadership qualities and environments, less face the revolving door of employee turnover and a weaker organization. Continue reading

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Filed under Careers, Education, human resources, Leadership, Psychology, USA

Peter Drucker Forum 2013: “Managing Complexity?” by Charles Handy

handy cover

At the 2013 Peter Drucker Forum, the British philosopher, Charles Handy began by pointing out that one person who was completely unconcerned by complexity in the world was Peter Drucker himself. He never touched the internet and did not like to use technology in general.  For the rest of us, we need to be able to deal with this.

 

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Filed under Business, Business Schools, Conference, Corporate strategy, Culture, Education, Higher Education, Leadership, Management, philosophy, Psychology, Strategy

Peter Drucker Forum 2013: “The embarrassment of complexity” by Helga Nowotny

nowotny cover

At the 2013 Peter Drucker Forum, Helga Nowotny looked at the embarrassment of complexity and in particular its positive sides. She argued that complexity can expand human capabilities by the clever use of technology linked to novel organizational forms. It humbles us in view of what can and cannot be predicted.

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Filed under Behavior, Business, Business Schools, Conference, Education, Entrepreneurship, Higher Education, human resources, Innovation, Psychology, Sociology, Strategy

BOOK REVIEW: “The Triumph of Emptiness: Consumption, Higher Education, and Work Organization” by Mats Alvesson (2013)

The Triumph of Emptiness: Consumption, Higher Education, and Work OrganizationReview by Philip Warwick

Mats Alvesson’s latest work centres on the depiction of three contemporary conditions of modern western society:  grandiosity, illusion tricks and zero sum games; principle among these being grandiosity.  Alvesson argues that behind the seemingly impressive façades, there is little to show for consumption, economic growth, prosperity or mass higher education.  He ends the book with the rather downbeat conclusion… underlying the grandiose society’s illusion tricks is the triumph of emptiness.

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Filed under Book Review, Business Schools, Consumer Behavior, Consumption, Guest Authors, Higher Education, Leadership, Psychology, Sociology, Strategy

BOOK REVIEW: “The Art of Choosing” by Sheena Iyengar (2010)

The Art of ChoosingIn a magazine interview, Catherine Zeta-Jones, the Welsh actress and wife of Michael Douglas, describes one of her daily chores, which involve making choices. 

It is,” she said, “deciding whether to buy that beautiful little dress she had found while shopping in California, knowing full well that the shoes you need to go with it were in one of your homes in the Caribbean or Europe.”  

Pity the rich and famous!

We have more choices today than we have ever had in history and yet making countless decisions each day may be a burden rather than a pleasure.  In this excellent book, which brings in scientific research and personal examples, Dr. Sheena Iyengar, Professor at Columbia University, describes just why some of these choices are so difficult. 

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Filed under Book Review, Consumer Behavior, Consumption, Economics, India, Psychology, USA

BOOK REVIEW: “The Art of the Sale” by Philip Delves Broughton (2013)

Cover picPhilip Delves Broughton made quite a name for himself by writing a book, which was highly critical of Harvard Business School and the MBA system in general.  During his time at HBS, he was surprised that sales was not part of the curriculum.  He expected it to be very present in MBA programs and yet found that, in general, they looked down upon such mercantile procedures. 

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Filed under Book Review, Business, Business Schools, Higher Education, MBA, Negotiation, Psychology, Strategy, USA