Category Archives: Intercultural

BOOK REVIEW: “Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die” by Chip Heath & Dan Heath (2010)

Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others DieDid you know that the Great Wall of China is the only man-made object visible from space? You did? It’s not true.  It’s what´s known as an urban myth.  These are so stories that are so popular that they have become ingrained in our culture, and become retold throughout the world.  In Made to Stick, Chip and Dan Heath explain why some of these stories ‘stick.’

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Filed under Behavior, Book Review, Culture, Intercultural, News, Psychology, Sociology

1st EFMD Americas Conference: Understanding Brazil and Latin Amercia

 

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At the 1st EFMD Americas in Sao Paulo, Ambassador Marcos Azambuja gave an amusing and insightful talk about the current state of Brazil. He talked about the political and economic context of the country, its strengths and also its weaknesses and the challenges it faces. Continue reading

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Filed under Careers, Economics, Education, Higher Education, Intercultural, International studies, Management

Durham University, research and Harry Potter!

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Last week, I had the pleasure of meeting up with two GEM students currently studying at Durham University in the north of England and my colleague and good friend, Philip Warwick. As well as being a regular contributor to Global Ed, Philip has done some excellent research on strategy and the internationalization of British universities and we are currently working on a research project together in the same field. While I was there though, I asked the two students, Margot Stokes  and Janhaëlle Ribeiro-Storm to give their perspective on studying in the UK and life as an international student.  Continue reading

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Filed under Business Schools, Education, Exchange study programs, Great Britain, Intercultural, International studies, Management, Study Abroad

Rick Goings, CEO of Tupperware: “Passion and Purpose are the keys to a successful career.”

Rick Going CEO Tupperware

At the recent Peter Drucker forum in Vienna, I was lucky enough to catch up with Rick Goings, CEO of the Tupperware Brands Corporation, a multi-brand, multi-category company. The company achieved great success by distinguishing itself through direct sales and its famous Tupperware parties. The company was founded just after the Second World War when it was all about ‘plastics’.  During the 50s, 60s, 70s and early 80s Tupperware went through wonderful years until it hit a wall. But Goings is passionate about the company and since he joined Tupperware in 1992, its fortunes have revived. Today it employs 13 500 people and has revenues of $2.3 billion.  

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Filed under Business, Careers, Corporate strategy, Entrepreneurship, Intercultural, Management, Strategy

A friend in change is a friend indeed

During the holiday I had a very pleasant surprise. Over the last 2 years I have looked at other blogs when writing my own to get ideas and inspiration. One of the best blogs I have seen in higher education is written by Martha Graham at James Madison University. We had both left several messages on each other’s blog (which included me stupidly calling Martha “Graham” for the first couple of months!) Even though we have never had the chance to meet we have had many exchanges over the past year or so.

Martha had written an excellent article on Bob Reid, former Dean at JMU and who is now Executive Vice President and Chief Accreditation Officer AACSB. Bob and I met up at the EFMD Annual Conference 2013 in Brussels and I send Martha the photo never expecting her to publish an article on it! I am very flattered indeed by what she has said.

An article in “The Economist” this week discusses research that shows the more time people spend on Facebook the less happy they are. Like Martha, I totally agree with this. However, technology today means that we can communicate with people without ever meeting up and I have been delighted to have many exchanges with Martha. As she says, we have become friends without ever seeing each other. 

There is another positive side. In her article, Martha refers to a friendly bet that we had concerning Greenland. Because of that, I did some quick research and was lucky enough to stumble upon a wonderful blog called The Fourth Continent. This is written by a lady who has emigrated to Greenland and gives some amazing insights into life there. I have become an avid reader of her blog which is quite a unique blog and well worth a read. So even a friendly challenge with someone you have never met can have a positive effect. 

The start of the coming academic year will be a little different for me this September, so I have asked a member of my team to begin writing another blog to take up some of the themes I have explored over the past two years. “Mainly International” will begin publishing in just over a week. When my colleagues and I started talking about the layout and the themes, I first asked them to look at the one Martha writes. My basic message was that I wanted the blog to be as good as “Be the Change.” That is just how highly I regard the blog. Not only does Martha write quite beautifully, the warmth and the attachment she feels towards students, staff and other members of the JMU community is quite evident. It makes it great reading. 

So, many thanks to Martha, not only for this post but also the the inspiration you have provided me in writing over the past year or so. I am sure that you provide the same inspiration to many other as well.

James Madison University's Be the Change

Go to any discussion board about social media or modern communication and you’re bound to find comments about the dismal state of interpersonal communication. Parents decry watching their children and friends sit side-by-side texting each other instead of talking face-to-face. And who among us has not doubted that one person can have 986 friends?

While the discussion is valid, it’s also worth noting that adaptation is a significant component of change. And what we are experiencing in the fast-changing realm of communication requires — demands, actually — an adaptation.

As a devotee of handwritten letters, I love getting real letters in my real 3-D mail box. Much history has been recorded by such letters. I’m reading a book by Dava Sorbel (Galileo’s Daughter) based on letters written to Galileo by his daughter. I’ve also written here about Dorie McCullough Lawson’s book (Posterity) a compilation of letters from…

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Gallipoli: Drawing different lessons from history.

Gallipoli: Drawing different lessons from history.

300 kilometres south west of Istanbul lies the small seaside town of Gelibulo. With a population of 30 000, this friendly little town has the makings of the perfect place to get away from the noise and the bustle of Istanbul. The sun never stops shining and the temperature is a near perfect 30°C. Only the incessant wind prevents it from being the ideal tourist location.

If this small town is practically unheard of under its Turkish name, its English translation, Gallipoli, is known to all historians of the First World War. Depending on where you come from though, you might not come to the same conclusions. The French have all but forgotten this 8 month campaign and the British view it as a foolhardy side show that was championed by Winston Churchill. To Australians and New Zealanders it is the symbol of the devastation suffered by their ANZAC soldiers for a colonial power. For the Turks, however, the campaign is one of their greatest victories which the rise of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk and ultimately saw the birth of the Turkish Republic.  Continue reading

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Filed under Countries, Culture, Great Britain, Intercultural, Strategy, Travel

The Unintended Consequences of Englishisation; c’est la vie! (Philip Warwick)

The Unintended Consequences of Englishisation; c'est la vie!

British newspapers were full of stories at the end of May about French universities considering teaching in English. There was an element of triumphalism to most of these news reports. Newspaper columnists and their editors had great fun compiling lists of English words in common usage in the French language.  My personal favourite is the French name for walkie-talkie two way radio systems, which my newspaper informs me is apparently talkie-walkie.  I guess it is quite normal for the institutions of two old rivals to enjoy the embarrassments and agonies of their adversary and to be rather jealous of any successes. C’est la vie!  Continue reading

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Filed under Business, Education, France, Great Britain, Guest Authors, Higher Education, Intercultural, Study Abroad