Category Archives: Culture

Peter Drucker Forum 2013: “Applying Complexity Science to Management” by Thierry Grange, Grenoble Ecole de Management

Grange

President of the Strategic Board, Grenoble Ecole de Management; and Special Advisor of the President of AACSB for Europe, spoke about his own personal experience in industry and how he came to discover Peter Drucker. He began the discussion with his favourite Peter Drucker quote:

“The purpose of the enterprise is to create value and there are therefore two functions that matter… Innovation and marketing create value and all the others are costs.”

Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Business, Business Schools, Conference, Culture, Innovation, Leadership, Management, Peter Drucker Forum, Strategy

Peter Drucker Forum 2013: “Managing Complexity?” by Charles Handy

handy cover

At the 2013 Peter Drucker Forum, the British philosopher, Charles Handy began by pointing out that one person who was completely unconcerned by complexity in the world was Peter Drucker himself. He never touched the internet and did not like to use technology in general.  For the rest of us, we need to be able to deal with this.

 

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Business, Business Schools, Conference, Corporate strategy, Culture, Education, Higher Education, Leadership, Management, philosophy, Psychology, Strategy

BOOK REVIEW: “A Song in the Night: A Memoir of Resilience” by Bob Massie (2012)

A Song in the Night: A Memoir of Resilience“From my earliest moments, my life was marked by deep joy interrupted regularly by searing physical pain.”

Born with hemophilia, Bob Massie’s story is literally stunning. I was fortunate enough to attend one of his talks recently and like some fifty odd colleagues I was spellbound for over an hour as he talked about the struggles he has had to overcome. He is not bitter or filled with regret. He final message is one of this hope and joy. “If I am lucky,” he says  “I have another 10 000 days on this Earth and I intend to enjoy every single one of them.”

A Song in the Night sets out his life story. Read this book and if you ever get the chance, find out where Mr. Massie is speaking and go and listen to him.  Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under Business, Careers, Culture, Education, Ethics, human resources, Leadership, Learning, Management, Sociology, USA

Danger on the Horse Highway: a slightly skeptical tourist remembers why the car replaced our equestrian friends.

Horse highway Kızıl Adalar, Turkey

It is a long forgotten fact that when cars were first introduced into cities in the late 19th Century they were welcomed as an environmentally friendly alternative to horses. With the help of two economists, a short trip around a ‘secluded’ island is a fun day out and a sanguine reminder of just why that might be. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Countries, Culture, Economics, Technology, Travel, Turkey, Vacation / Holidays

Didim. Did it. But I didn’t do my research.

Didim beach, Turkey

One of the things professors are constantly telling students is to make sure they read the entire exam paper before starting and never sign an employment contract before they have studied it several times. The same logic works for a holiday destination and this professor might think about taking his own well meant advice. 

Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under Behavior, Countries, Culture, Europe, France, International studies, Travel, Turkey, Vacation / Holidays

Gallipoli: Drawing different lessons from history.

Gallipoli: Drawing different lessons from history.

300 kilometres south west of Istanbul lies the small seaside town of Gelibulo. With a population of 30 000, this friendly little town has the makings of the perfect place to get away from the noise and the bustle of Istanbul. The sun never stops shining and the temperature is a near perfect 30°C. Only the incessant wind prevents it from being the ideal tourist location.

If this small town is practically unheard of under its Turkish name, its English translation, Gallipoli, is known to all historians of the First World War. Depending on where you come from though, you might not come to the same conclusions. The French have all but forgotten this 8 month campaign and the British view it as a foolhardy side show that was championed by Winston Churchill. To Australians and New Zealanders it is the symbol of the devastation suffered by their ANZAC soldiers for a colonial power. For the Turks, however, the campaign is one of their greatest victories which the rise of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk and ultimately saw the birth of the Turkish Republic.  Continue reading

6 Comments

Filed under Countries, Culture, Great Britain, Intercultural, Strategy, Travel

BOOK REVIEW: “When Core Values Are Strategic: How the Basic Values of Procter & Gamble Transformed Leadership at Fortune 500 Companies” by Rick Tocquigny

When Core Values Are Strategic: How the Basic Values of Procter & Gamble Transformed Leadership at Fortune 500 CompaniesOne of the side effects of buying books on Amazon these days is that you often buy them based on titles, and don’t get the chance to look through them.  For sure, Amazon has a search device that allows you to go through the book, but this is actually quite slow and difficult to deal with, so personally I don’t bother.  The result of this is that you sometime end up buying books that you wouldn’t necessarily have bought, had you seen it in a bookstore.  This is one case in question.  This is not necessarily a bad thing, as it will sometimes give you a different perspective and challenge you to read in different ways.

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Book Review, Business, Corporate Behavior, Corporate culture, Culture, Management, Sociology, Strategy, USA