Monthly Archives: July 2013

BOOK REVIEW: “How Countries Compete: Strategy, Structure, and Government in the Global Economy” by Richard Vietor (2007)

How Countries Compete: Strategy, Structure, and Government in the Global EconomyHow Countries Compete is a political and economic strategic analysis of 11 different countries around the world.  The book is divided into 12 new chapters, which deal with one country per chapter.  Japan is dealt with twice, looking at it from a historical perspective at the beginning of the book, and then looking more towards the future and there after the pre 1990 crisis.  Richard Vietor uses the word “compete” in the sense that countries try to compete for market share in the world economy and gain foreign investment and export their sales in business.  Governments can help in this policy, either by macroeconomic policies that encourage investment and greater economic activity, or by things like increasing human resource competencies through education.  Some countries have very active and direct policies.  In China, for example, technology transfer and know-how has been encouraged through the use of FDI.  In Singapore, workers are required to save as much as 50% of their gross income for their retirement plan.

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Filed under Asia, China, Economics, Finance, India, Japan, Politics, Strategy, USA

BOOK REVIEW: “When Core Values Are Strategic: How the Basic Values of Procter & Gamble Transformed Leadership at Fortune 500 Companies” by Rick Tocquigny

When Core Values Are Strategic: How the Basic Values of Procter & Gamble Transformed Leadership at Fortune 500 CompaniesOne of the side effects of buying books on Amazon these days is that you often buy them based on titles, and don’t get the chance to look through them.  For sure, Amazon has a search device that allows you to go through the book, but this is actually quite slow and difficult to deal with, so personally I don’t bother.  The result of this is that you sometime end up buying books that you wouldn’t necessarily have bought, had you seen it in a bookstore.  This is one case in question.  This is not necessarily a bad thing, as it will sometimes give you a different perspective and challenge you to read in different ways.

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Filed under Book Review, Business, Corporate Behavior, Corporate culture, Culture, Management, Sociology, Strategy, USA

BOOK REVIEW: “Concise Guide to Macroeconomics: What Managers, Executives, and Students Need to Know” by David A. Moss (2007)

Concise Guide to Macroeconomics: What Managers, Executives, and Students Need to Know“A Concise Guide to Macroeconomics” is an introduction to some of the main concepts and theories around the discipline.  It centers on three basic pillars: output, money, and expectations.  The book is essentially designed for managers and executives who may not be familiar with the main theories of macroeconomics.  David Moss uses considerable experience he has gained, teaching at Harvard Business School, and particularly on executive education programs, to bring some complex issues to the reader in a very simple way.

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Filed under Book Review, Business, Consumption, Economics, Finance, Strategy, USA

How partnerships can enhance organisational change.

Conferences, Partnerships and Change

Whilst the subject of the UK Higher Education Academy (HEA) 2013 conference, at Warwick University was partnerships; the issue of organisational change also ran through nearly all the sessions, in particular the idea that universities cannot stand still doing the same thing year after year.  Speaker after speaker illustrated how partnerships are one way in which they can effect change.

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Filed under Business Schools, Conference, Education, Exchange study programs, Great Britain, Higher Education, International studies, Internships, MBA

BOOK REVIEW: “The Great Brain Race: How Global Universities Are Reshaping the World” by Ben Wildavsky (2010)

The Great Brain Race: How Global Universities Are Reshaping the WorldDespite a few prestigious universities having been around for several centuries, such as Cambridge, Oxford, Harvard, and the like, universities are, to some extent, a 19th century phenomenon, originally with the model created by Humboldt in Germany.  In fact, the massification of higher education is a post WWII phenomena.  Up until that time, only a small percentage of the population was able to go to university.  Today, higher education represents 1% of world GDP.

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Filed under Book Review, Business, Business Schools, Higher Education, International studies, Rankings, Strategy, Study Abroad, USA